Marty Martindale

About Marty Martindale

Foodsite Magazine and Marty aim to help the cooking-challenged avoid dependence on others due to lack of cooking knowhow. We concentrate on quick breakfasts, portable lunches and “good-4-u” night meals. With readily available web translation, the magazine explains separate foods, a little of their history, their nutrition, suggested “go-withs,” serving ideas and links to foodsites with recipes.

Chickens are Complicated
Marty Martindale

We already know it’s important to coddle chickens after we buy them. Keep them refrigerated, use very soon and do not wash in your sink or on your counter. If you do, and the chicken is with disease, it’s then all over your kitchen. Not good. Next, when seemingly cooked, we know the dangers of any pinkish fluids in their joints when examined. After we seemingly successfully challenge all these hurdles, it’s time to consider the rest of the meal, serve it all and then sit down and enjoy eating it. 

In our travels we ran across a link to the CHICKEN GLOSSARY put out by the Raising Chickens Organization. 

Take a look at it. Chickies are complicated little critters, and we eat an awful lot of them. 

Beer Jelly – Beer Jam, Basic or Your Way
Marty Martindale

Beer jelly is fun, it’s sweet, it’s savory, it jiggles, it contrasts, it complements, it surprises, it glazes, it dresses and it borrows craft genius from some amazing brewers. No buzz, tho.

Also called beer jam, beer is usually one of only four ingredients: beer, sugar, pectin and lemon. The buzz may be gone, but the delicacy intended by its brewers comes through nicely – a purist’s joy of joys.

Food Republic in an article titled “Spreadable Beer Jelly Could Be The Next Big Thing,” Tiffany Do states,”Potlicker Kitchen makes a slew of different varieties of the stuff, including Black India Pale Ale, Hefeweizen with Orange, Oatmeal Stout and something called the Heady Jelly made with Alchemist Brewery’s Heady Topper. Each jar is made with a different beer and includes a suggested food pairing. We’re already thinking about trying out the Apricot Ale with some bacon sticky buns.”

For those who care to elaborate on “perfection,” they contrive savory concoctions by adding tomato, brown sugar, balsamic vinegar, shallots, Parmesan cheese grated, rosemary, olive oil or something you choose. For sweet experimentation some add vanilla bean, lemon, star anise, sugar, allspice, cloves, orange zest, or again, you think create! Continue reading