Whole Grain Salads — One-Dish Meal!
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Grains are ancient. The ancient Middle East loved its grains from start.Now that the western world has an almost constant focus on that region, their foods enter our liives more frequently. Grains are very healthy. Whenever possible, skip white pastas, breads, rices and potatoes and substitute grains.

Here’s a sensible, quick, healthy, modular grain salad reference chart. For a delicious, basic grain salad simply allow:

1 cup COOKED grain for each person from List I
(See Grain Chart below for cooking times and amounts based on one cup UNCOOKED grains)
Any combination from List II
Choose dressing from List III

From the Whole Grains council, save this handy GRAIN AMOUNT AND COOKING CHART. Keep cooked grains in your refrigerator for quick snacking and interesting recipes.

LIST I – GRAIN SALAD CANDIDATES:

Amaranth
Barley
Buckwheat
Bulgur
Couscous, whole wheat
Kamut®
Millet,
Quinoa
Rice, brown
Rye berries
Spelt berries
Wheat berries
Wild rice

LIST II, CUSTOMIZE SALAD WITH ANY COMBINATION OF CHOPPED:

Avocado
Beans
Berries
Bread cubes
Cheese, crumbled or grated
Chilies
Cucumber
Fruit, fresh or dried
Garlic
Herbs tomatoes
Meat, chopped
Melon chunks
Mushrooms
Nuts/peanuts
Olives
Onions, any kind
Parsley/cilantro
Pasta
Radishes
Roasted peppers
Salad greens
Seafood
Seeds
Sprouts
Tofu
Veggies, any blanched, frozen, leftover or raw

LIST III:  DRESSING:  (Go for simple, inexpensive and fresh-made:  bottled dressings cost too much and have too many chemicals, too much salt and too much sweetener.)

Lemon or lime juice and salt
Mayo, thinned with broth, juice or vinaigrette
Soy, dipping sauce
Vinaigrette (Basic 1 part oil; 2/3 part lemon or vinegar, dab of mustard, herbs and seasoning. Whisk.)

Chill or serve at room temp. Ideally, make salad an hour or two ahead for maximum flavor.

Enjoy and send leftovers in lunches tomorrow!

 

 

About Marty Martindale

Foodsite Magazine and Marty aim to help the cooking-challenged avoid dependence on others due to lack of cooking knowhow. We concentrate on quick breakfasts, portable lunches and “good-4-u” night meals. With readily available web translation, the magazine explains separate foods, a little of their history, their nutrition, suggested “go-withs,” serving ideas and links to foodsites with recipes.

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