MINIMALIST BITTMAN’S GLORIOUS 101 SALAD DAYS OF SUMMER
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Salads are especially exciting these days, because we are seeing more and more Middle Eastern and Asian influences in salads, not the old lettuce, tomato, a few cucumbers, celery, some green peppers, the old, chapter-and-verse green salad.

Wikipedia defines salads as:  Salad is any of a wide variety of dishes, including vegetable salads; salads of pasta, legumes, eggs or grains; mixed salads incorporating meat, poultry or seafood; and fruit salads. They may include a mixture of cold and hot, often including raw vegetables or fruits. Bittman’s 101 have all the bases covered. He divides his into six categories:  vegan, vegetarian, salads with seafood, salads with meat, salads with noodles and salads with grains. Notice his emphasis on simplicity, which turns out to be healthy.

And, he won’t leave you high and dry for a dressing, for each has its own to compliment the ingredients. Most bottled dressings are expensive, chemical-laden, too sweet and heavy on the salt. Spare yourself.

Here’s a glimpse of  just a few of the salads and their dressings:

Mushrooms, shaved parmesan and parsley
Quinoa, apricots, cherries and pecans
Blanched spinach, pine nuts, raisins,
Fennel and prune plums
Carrots, sunflower seeds and blueberries
Greens with walnuts, blue cheese and raspberries
And 95 more summer salad delights!

It will be a very thoughtful gesture to share this link with your friends and relatives: From the New York Times, 101 SIMPLE SALADS FOR THE SEASON.

Catch The Minimalist  at 10:30 Sunday mornings on the
COOKING CHANNEL.

For many more recipes, visit MARKBITTMAN.COM.

Also BITTMAN’S DINER’S JOURNAL
(New York Times) online

Subscribe to Mark Bittman’s Reading List

About Marty Martindale

Foodsite Magazine and Marty aim to help the cooking-challenged avoid dependence on others due to lack of cooking knowhow. We concentrate on quick breakfasts, portable lunches and “good-4-u” night meals. With readily available web translation, the magazine explains separate foods, a little of their history, their nutrition, suggested “go-withs,” serving ideas and links to foodsites with recipes.

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