Salt Water Taffy with or without a Boardwalk
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The pounding surf, the cries of the gulls, rippling sea breezes, predictable carnival rides, cameras galore and sought-after tackiness, this is the beach where everyone’s hanging loose munching on the usual seaside tempters — caramels, fudge, pralines, candy apples, funnel cake, cotton candy and good old salt water taffy which happens to contain no salt water at all!

Flavors range from Jalapeno to Molasses, from Pina Colada to Cherry Cheesecake, from coffee to Fluffernut, and the list is long. The Canadian favorite is maple syrup taffy.   Continue reading

Tahini is not a Polynesian Island
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Tahini could be called tahini butter, for it is sesame seeds roasted and combined with a little oil until it is smooth and blended. It, plus some lemon juice and garlic, is the basis of several Middle Eastern dishes, made with tahini. It gives almost any dish a nutty, creamy flavor, not only in main dishes but in desserts, as well. 

Sesame seeds are said to be one of the first sources of edible oil, and the earliest reference is found in an Assyrian myth, where it states the gods consumed sesame wine on the night before creating the earth. Other early records state Sesame is from India with use dating back to 3,000 B.C., when they burned sesame oil for light as well as for soot for their ink-block drawings. African slaves called sesame seeds benne seeds and used that name when they took them to North America. Even to now, one of the favored South Carolinean dishes is Benne Seed Cookies. Sesame seed oil is still an important sourse of fat for those cooking in the Near and Far East. 

You can buy tahini in the supermarket or make your own: Continue reading