CHIMICHURRI: Exciting South American sauce for just about anything
avatar

The “Chims” get confusing. Chim Chim Cher-ee is a song from Mary Poppins. Put an “s” on the end of Chimichurri and you have a popular Dominican Republic pork sandwich, sometimes called a “Chimi.” Sweep the song and the sandwich aside, we’re here to learn about Chimichurri and add a new condiment to our treasure kit. It is the popular Argentinian sauce for meats, Chimichurri. You might kind of call it a tart, to cut meat’s greasiness, herb-crowded vinaigrette or fresh meat sauce.

The Argentines are very nostalgic about their gauchos, their exciting adventures on the  pampas plains’ herding cattle resulting he-man open wood fires. Chimichurri  is part of this gaucho scene; just call it their “steak sauce.”

Basically, Chimichurri is a spicy herb condiment for a number of uses. Its basic ingredients are parsley, oil, vinegar and oregano. However, there are a great number of tasty innovations. This sauce is used as a marinade, a basting sauce, general condiment, dipping sauce, salad dressing, vegetable topping and sandwich topping.

The name, Chimichurri, comes mostly from people of other cultures trying to force their condiment terms onto the Argentinians, and the resulting word corruptions morphed into the word, “Chimichurri.”

Another bonus for Chimichurri is it is fresh and healthy with no chemicals, sugars or great amounts of salt. Additionally, fresh parsley is richer in vitamin C than oranges, it contains body cleansing compounds , can reduce inflammation, contains histamines and possesses properties valuable for treating kidney malfunctions.

LET’S GET MODULAR ABOUT IT:

No good gauchlo or South American woman needs a cookbook to make a Chimmichuri. She uses a general method, adding what she has on hand using certain guidelines. We can do it too:

GREEN BASE, USE AT LEAST TWO CUPFULS:

Flat leaf parsley
Italian parsley
Curley leaf parsley
Cilantro
Oregano leaves

OIL (ENOUGH TO CREATE DESIRED THICKNESS)

Olive oil
Vegetable oil

TARTNESS (USE LESS THAN HALF THE AMOUNT OF OIL)

Red wine vinegar
White rice vinegar
Sherry wine vinegar
Fresh lemon juice

NECESSARY STANDBYS (TO TASTE)

Garlic
Red pepper flakes

OPTIONAL SPICING, (USE 3 OR 4, CHANGE IT UP EVERY TIME.)

Fresh black pepper, kosher salt
Dried oregano
Capers
Red onion
Fresh tomato
Sweet paprika
Dried thyme
Scallion
Bay leaf
Cumin
Onion
Red bell pepper

You can hand-chop the ingredients for a chunky result. Pulsing lightly in a food processor makes the mixture finer. Using a blender will make the sauce quite smooth, if this is what you are looking for.

Store in a clean glass jar in refrigerator for at least an hour before serving at room temperature.

 

 

Marty Martindale

About Marty Martindale

Foodsite Magazine and Marty aim to help the cooking-challenged avoid dependence on others due to lack of cooking knowhow. We concentrate on quick breakfasts, portable lunches and “good-4-u” night meals. With readily available web translation, the magazine explains separate foods, a little of their history, their nutrition, suggested “go-withs,” serving ideas and links to foodsites with recipes.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *