Foodsite Magazine

Foodsite Magazine Friday Picks
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ASIAN FOOD CHANNEL  Asia food can be simple yet tasty, then there’s the challenge of combining new food combinations! Yes, it’s a cousin to Food Network.

VAUCLUSE, NYC 

  • Blue Crab, Hearts of Palm, Apples and Hazel Nuts
  • Lobster-Filled Calamari
  • Escargots a la Bourguignon
  • Black Pearl Caviar
  • Tortelli, Goat Cheese Ravioli, Prosciutto, Tomato
  • Rabbit and Cheese Ravioli
  • Truite Amandine
  • Homard Thermidor
  • Cote de Veau
  • Tournedos Rossini
  • Canard a L’Orange

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Ricotta, so Fresh, so Creamy
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What has Ricotta always meant to you? Was it something your mom had to remember every time she  made lasagna? Then you later found the left-over Ricotta not all that interesting, so you avoided it thereafter.

We now have developed more tasty ways to enjoy Ricotta, which can be substituted by Creame Fraiche or Queso Fresco.

In her book, Italian Food, Elizabeth David states, The three cheeses essential to Italian cooking are: Grana, known all over the world as Parmesan; Mozzarella, that elastic white buffalo-milk cheese of the south; and Ricotta, a soft milk cheese, unsalted, which is at its best in the spring, in Rome and round about…Ricotta is a cheese which must be eaten very fresh. With a little salt and ground black pepper it has a lovely countrified flavor. It is pounded up and mixed with spinach to make the most delicious gnocchi and ravioli …” Continue reading

Foodsite Magazine Friday Picks
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COOKING DETECTIVE   Discover 39 health benefits from eating garlic.   

FEARINGTON HOUSE, PITTSBORO, NC 

  • Hamachi with Summer Peach & Yogurt
  • Foie Gras with Maple & Sweet Potato
  • Wooly Pig with Medjool Dates & Onions
  • Striped Bass with Fearrington Honey & Hen of the Woods
  • Lobster with Salsify & White Chocolate
  • Valrhona Cœur de Guanaja Chocolate Soufflé  (TO DIE FOR!!)

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Malted Milk Powder in your Smoothie?
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If you stopped by a soda fountain today, which you can hardly do anymore, you’d find hand-made Cokes, you’d have also seen a stand holding a container of Horlick’s Malt Powder. Now, these are all gone, except powdered malt which is now readily available in supermarkets near the cocoa and hot drink section.  

Malt starts as sprouted barley which is dried then ground into powder. It is combined with dried milk to become malted milk which goes on to be malt balls, Ovaltine, milkshakes and an important kitchen cooking ingredient. Malt’s flavor can be described as subtle, roasted and a bit nutty. When malt doesn’t become malted powder it goes on to be important in the making of beer, whiskey and malt vinegar. Continue reading

Foodsite Magazine Friday Picks
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GRILLED CHEESE ACADEMY  Find more grilled cheese recipe combinations than you will ever make!


JOY LUCK PALACE, NEW YORK

  • Shredded Squid with Cashew Nuta
  • Frog with Squash and Fungus
  • Braised Goose Feet and Whole Abalone
  • Snails with Fish Sauce
  • Stir-Fried Pig’s Belly, Peppers, Broccoli
  • Cuttlefish with XO Sauce
  • Steamed, Sliced Conch
  • Sweet & Sour Flounder
  • Ox Tail with Pumpkin Casserole
  • Chow Style Water Spinach

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Hot Buttered Rum Revival!*
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Hot Buttered Rum, the drink, like a cake, starts with a batter! 

Originally a get-well drink for sea-battered sailors, Hot Buttered Rum over the years has become a sociable beverage for skiers, skaters, hikers, ice fishermen, sleigh riders and any group looking for fun on a cold winter’s day or night. 

There is no hard, set recipe for Hot Buttered Rum except it contains at least a goodly amount of rum, melted butter and fragrant spices. Adjustments vary in sweetness, spiciness and creaminess. 

The hot toddy cocktails we know and love today have their roots in the old days, when druggists might have prescribed them for relief against the aches and pains the bitterly-cold winters brought. Butter has been used in hot drinks since the days of Henry VIII. After molasses began being imported to Colonial America from Jamaica, and distilleries opened in New England in the 1650s, colonists began adding distilled rum to hot recreational beverages such as toddies and nogs. Continue reading

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