Foodsite Magazine

Foodsite Magazine Friday Picksday
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BRICK STREET FARMS   Amazing hydroponics in action in St. Petersburg FL. Herbs for sale, too.        

MAIALINO, NEW YORK   

  • Spaghetti alla Carbonara
  • Suckling Pig Ragu
  • Pasta with Clams, white wine and garlic
  • Rigatoni with Squash and Pork Sausage
  • Squid Ink Pasta with Crab, Calabrese Chili and Basil
  • Sea Bream, Cucumber and Panzanella
  • Seared Arctic Char, Corn and Green Tomato
  • Dry Aged Duck Breast, Farro and Cherry
  • Roast Pork, Romano Bean and Tomato
  • Salt-Baked Sea Bass for Two

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Tahini is not a Polynesian Island
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Tahini could be called tahini butter, for it is sesame seeds roasted and combined with a little oil until it is smooth and blended. It, plus some lemon juice and garlic, is the basis of several Middle Eastern dishes, made with tahini. It gives almost any dish a nutty, creamy flavor, not only in main dishes but in desserts, as well. 

Sesame seeds are said to be one of the first sources of edible oil, and the earliest reference is found in an Assyrian myth, where it states the gods consumed sesame wine on the night before creating the earth. Other early records state Sesame is from India with use dating back to 3,000 B.C., when they burned sesame oil for light as well as for soot for their ink-block drawings. African slaves called sesame seeds benne seeds and used that name when they took them to North America. Even to now, one of the favored South Carolinean dishes is Benne Seed Cookies. Sesame seed oil is still an important sourse of fat for those cooking in the Near and Far East. 

You can buy tahini in the supermarket or make your own: Continue reading

Foodsite Magazine Picksday Friday
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JAMIE OLIVER  Let him suggest what to cook for your mom on her day.   

FISH CITY GRILL, SOUTHERN U.S.  

  • Fried Dill Pickles
  • Oyster Nachos
  • Quinoa, Kale & Salmon Sala
  • Roasted Jalapeno Soup
  • Serafin’s Fish Tacos
  • Shrimp & Grits
  • Apple Cider Slaw
  • Alaskan Snow Crab Boil

 

CHEWEY DOG FOOD  Fresh, nutritious and get it by mai

TASTE OF HOME  Find a recipe for delicious pumpkin bread.  

HUFFINGTON POST  Discover Yuengling Butter Beer for Harry Potter’s sake!

Ouzo, A Cook’s Friend, too!
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Those, not Greek, tend to know ouzo best as the fun incendiary when a restaurant waiter torches an appetizer of white cheese.

“Opa!” everyone shouts.

The crowd responds with an excited chorus of “Opa’s!”

All too soon the waiter douses the flame with fresh lemon juice.

The warm, crusty, tangy cheese remains get consumed by all.

Ouzo is made from distilled grapes, flavored with aniseed, also mint and fennel. Some bottler recipes call for cinnamon, mastic (a resin), coriander, cloves or cardamom. Its alcohol potency ranges from moderate to strong and can pack a wallop. When adding some to an open skillet, take the pan away from the stove, as it flames easily.

Besides sipping ouzo it’s also a cook’s friend for a hard-to-figure-out, licorice flavor a non-Greek can’t put their finger on. Some compare it to the famed absinthe, and a museum on the Greek island of Lesbos is dedicated to Ouzo. Thoroughly enjoying the sipping of ouzo is considered a Mediterranean art. Though clear by itself, ouzo turns milky white when ice is added to it and changes it chemically.  Continue reading

Foodsite Magazine Friday Picks
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ASIAN FOOD CHANNEL  Asia food can be simple yet tasty, then there’s the challenge of combining new food combinations! Yes, it’s a cousin to Food Network.

VAUCLUSE, NYC 

  • Blue Crab, Hearts of Palm, Apples and Hazel Nuts
  • Lobster-Filled Calamari
  • Escargots a la Bourguignon
  • Black Pearl Caviar
  • Tortelli, Goat Cheese Ravioli, Prosciutto, Tomato
  • Rabbit and Cheese Ravioli
  • Truite Amandine
  • Homard Thermidor
  • Cote de Veau
  • Tournedos Rossini
  • Canard a L’Orange

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Ricotta, so Fresh, so Creamy
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What has Ricotta always meant to you? Was it something your mom had to remember every time she  made lasagna? Then you later found the left-over Ricotta not all that interesting, so you avoided it thereafter.

We now have developed more tasty ways to enjoy Ricotta, which can be substituted by Creame Fraiche or Queso Fresco.

In her book, Italian Food, Elizabeth David states, The three cheeses essential to Italian cooking are: Grana, known all over the world as Parmesan; Mozzarella, that elastic white buffalo-milk cheese of the south; and Ricotta, a soft milk cheese, unsalted, which is at its best in the spring, in Rome and round about…Ricotta is a cheese which must be eaten very fresh. With a little salt and ground black pepper it has a lovely countrified flavor. It is pounded up and mixed with spinach to make the most delicious gnocchi and ravioli …” Continue reading

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